The Book Thief

I watched the film The Book Thief with a group of sixth graders (thirteen-year-olds) in English with English subtitles. We stopped the film every five or ten minutes, discussed what we had just seen (language, words used, what happened, why) went back to the beginning of the given section, stopped after each sentence to make sure everyone understood everything. The children chose their favourite sentences (one each), wrote it down on a piece of paper, wich they carried in their pockets until our next session. We listened to the “favourite sentences” again, paying special attention to the intonation. Students were free to choose very short (very simple) or very long (complicated) sentences in order to make sure that they were comfortable with their sentences and in order to let them take risks at their own, individual speed. While everyone was supposed to know by heart only the sentences he / she had chosen, more often than not, they also remembered each other’s sentences. At the beginning of the next session, we combined the sentences with some kind of movement. The children also had to remember the order of the sentences (as they originally appeared in the film) and with the number of sentences growing every time, their task was becoming more and more complex. At the end of the term, we also wrote a completely different story, using the same sentences. You can watch here a short video we also made at the end of the term: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B9c-s4zWuiQPcU5mUjFFV25jMDg/view?usp=sharing

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